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20121201
20121231
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KQED (PBS) 25
WHUT (Howard University Television) 15
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English 56
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 56 (some duplicates have been removed)
>> welcome to the program. we're in washington for a conversation with al hunt and julianna goldman of blockberg news about the events this week, 9 fiscal cliff, questions about gun control, and others. >> was talking toome negotiating experts this week as i was work on a story about the relationship between the speaker and the president. and they say that in effective negotiation the person with the leverage needs to let the other party save face. and in this situation the president does hold the cards. he has the leverage and by giving the concessions on medicare, on medicaid, on social security, he would have taken a lot of heat from progressives who were already starting to hear that this week. and they that would have been through the saving face that could have helped john bayne never this. >> we continue with george stens founder of the kennedy center honors program and the american film institute. >> president kennedy said i look forward to an america that will not be afraid of grace and bite. i look forward to an american that will honor achievement in the arts, the way we
rose. . >> rose: we're in washington where fiscal cliff negotiations continue. as we taped this program it is 5:30 p.m. the house of representatives is expected to vote on the republican plan b later it this evening. house majority leader eric cantor urged democrats to support the bill which extends the bush tax cuts on income over 1 million. >> we house republicans are taking concrete actions to avoid the fiscal cliff. absent a balanced offer from the president, this is our nation's best option. and senate democrats should take up both of these measures immediately. and the president has a decision to make. he can support these measures or be responsible for reckless spending and the largest tax hike in american history. >> rose: the white house has pledged to veto plan b as 2012 comes to a close it remains to be seen whether law lakers will rise above partisanship or avert fiscal crisis. joining me al hunt and july yana goldman. we want to talk about the fiscal cliff. we want to talk about white house appointments. we want to talk about gun control and we want to talk about hearings o
that it was a pretty recent special forces mission, there was a lot of discussion about it in washington and details were coming out all over the place. but the intelligence hunt was, took a little longer to report out. >> rose: is what came out from brennan and what we now know, is it different? >> it's been, it's been, it's been clarified over time. >> rose: when he was shot, that kind of thing. >> the details of the raid have come into better focus. >> rose: how do you explain that variance. >> i don't think there's any great mystery to it. >> rose: is it the fog of war or something else. >> 20 odd guys and they all have slightly different recollections and information's being passed up the food chain very quickly and you know, it's pretty remarkable. i mean they're being debriefed probably within minutes, you know, and then as soon as they land, i'm sure they're being debriefed and people then passing that information along. it doesn't seem that extraordinary to me. but i will tell you that we were, i thought that there was going to be a 40-minute fire fight in this movie. and we were actual
heard and hold washington accountable for facing up to the epidemic of gun violence in our country. if this moment passes in to memory without action from washington, it will be a stain upon our nation's commitment to protecting the innocence innocent including our children. >> rose: i'm pleased to have mayor bloomberg back at this table. >> thank you for having me. >> rose: on "meet the press" yesterday, at a press conference today you believe that the time is now, that this is the moment to act, and at the same time you are chastising the president for-- i believe the time was a long time ago, the president gave a speech after the massacre in a-- aurora, colorado, saying we have to do something. here we are two years later, another 21,000 people in america killed with guns. we've done nothing. i mean, you know, i don't know at what point you have to say enough is enough. we've been killing 34 americans every single day. that's bigger than virginia tech. every single day. and you done cover it because it's 34 separate occurrences arod the country. and it dsn't grab the public's im
have in the past. >> rose: julianna goldman of bloomberg joins me from washington and she interviewed president obama on tuesday. that was an excerpt from her interview and i'm pleased to have her on this program. and congratulations first of all. >> charlie thanks very much. it was a great opportunity. >> rose: tell me how you found the president. not in terms of the sort of term temperment in terms of where his mind is set at this moment. >> there was a little bit of chitchat before we started the interview and i had the opportunity to congratulate him for the first time since his election. and i said you've been a little busy. he said yes no trip to disneyworld for me. so he seemed a little tired. he seemed a little frustrated at the pace of how these negotiations are going. but he also came across as the cool, calm, no drama obama that we've come to know from him as a candidate and as president. he really was very firm. we kept trying to push him on this tax issue, and he looks like he has learned the lesson from various debt negotiations, budget talks from. debt ceiling, negotia
and washington, d.c. because we've stood tall as good, honest partner with the chinese. but what's also incumbent on you is when you've earned that position occasionally you have to speak up. and i did. >> rose: as you know, when you speak up about china people also say "look at general electric, this great american company. they're exporting jobs as well." >> we have jobs all over the world, right? so we are the second-biggest exporter behind boeing. we're a net exporter in every other country in the world. but we will sell more gas turbines -- we have a 50% market share of the large gas turbine market. we will sell more in algeria in the next three years than the united states. so what are we supposed to do? are we supposed to sit here and just say, oh, it's too hard? >> rose: and if you don't get the business somebody else will. >> somebody else is going to get it. we're down to the point after 130 years that basically we're the only american company left and most of the businesses -- love us or hate us, we're the only american left. so i think you would be better off as an american citizen wa
, and doing some speaking but staying as far from washington, d.c. as i can. >> rose: when you look at writing a book, i mean, how hard is that for you to take the time anand think of all of the events and make sure that you get it right as you recollect it? >> first i have given myself a little out at the beginning by saying this is a purely personal reminiscence of what i experienced and what i saw, i am not trying to write the defensive history and others will have a different perspective on things, but it was -- we were at war every day of the four and a half years i was in office, and as i write in the book it wasn't just the wars in iraq and afghanistan, it was daily wars with the congress, with other agencies, with the white house, and also i would say with my own building, with the pentagon. >> rose: fighting over what within the pentagon? >> trying to make the first priority of the pentagon to be successful in the wars we were already in, the pentagon bureaucracy is structured to plan for war, not to wage war, and so getting badly needed equipment to the troops fast in months rather t
very geospecific peach that grows in eastern washington. so they're trying to say don't let our biodiversity shrink to make it more efficient. let's keep biodiversity as an important thing and help promulgate and keep these things going by supporting them, creating a market for them and helping to get to the place. so that's what slow food is. >> the fact that you're no longer in the kitchen much, that you're an entrepreneur, does that mean the restaurant is not really yours anymore? >> no, as alain ducass once told me, "i 'nam all the kitchens all the time." ducasse. and he's got more than me. >> rose: this is a guy who survived a plane crash, by the way. >> i would say my philosophy and the people i have trained to work with me represent exactly a group effort of what we think a great restaurant should be. my influence is there a so they wouldn't put things on the menu that i wouldn't approve of and i go to all the restaurants in new york at least two or three times a week. >> rose: two or three times a week? >> for a couple hours. i have eight in a new york. >> rose: so you'r
haven and even in washington, there is some doubt as to whether they will be able to get information out of that or much information given how badly damaged it is. >> rose: tell me about mental health and profiles. and what we know about people who do this kind of thing. >> well, charlie, sadly mental health does figure into these wanton and horrific crimes that do occur. because of the fact that certain types of mental illness if untreated do raise the risk of people acting in a way which seems irrational and perpetrates harm and possibly lots of life on other people. the usual context in which this occurs is when an individual has a psychotic disorder such as schizophrenia, such as a mood disorder with psychotic features. and they're impelled by their symptoms, principlesfully the delusions. they think false beliefs and have to act at the behest of these or they're hearing voices which are commanding them to do things. this is an example of what happened with jared loughner in arizona with gabbie giffords, congressman giffords and is likely the motivating factors with the student at vi
of the north lawn of the white house and, you know, but it is the washington coverage, obama versus mcchrystal and competent address coming, petraeus and replacing mcchrystal and what is the troop going to be, 10,000, 40,000, and, you know, it is superficial, i am only going to talk about my own coverage, that is superficial coverage and that is what i was doing. it is political, and it is treating troops as if we are talking about, you know, manufacturing, you know, some sort of toy, 40,000, 20,000, and for whatever reason, combat outpost keating slapped me out of that, i can't explain it, and i just had to know more about who these eight men were that were killed, why is there this mystery, why would anybody put an outpost there what is it like to wake up and be facing and out numbering force, seven to eight, seven to eight or one of ferocious taliban fighters, all of these things that i had just kind of not paid any attention to. >> rose: so at the end of the day it is a story about what? >> >> at the end of the day, it is a story about reckless decisions by commanders and unbelievably hero
who had infur yatesed and embarrassed him when he was on a visit to washington on this action of taking this island, in canada. and winston was really furious. and apparently launch mood this great tirade. and monet was meant to sort of help with the translation of that, ease the passage of all this. and at the end of this tirade apparently de gaulle who was in full uniform simply rose and put on his hat and saluted, and left the room. and churchill who had been absolutely infuriate add cording to monet slided back into his chair an simply said magnificent. >> rose: wait, magnificent in applause. >> applause. >> de gaulles theatre. >> the sense of theatre, in response to churchill's tirade was for him to walk out. >> rose: he so was appreciative of defall. >> there are two people, you know, who are famously opposed not get on and they had flaming rowe but there was a real sense of mutual respect between them because these were two men who hundreds of men stuck up for thane own. >> insomitiable spirit despice-- despite of the odds. >> indomitiable but patriotic. they respected
in politics who don't like the republicans who do not like the democrats, who do not like washington, you know what they do like? they like barack obama because they sense something about him that he's not a part of it. so even that first debate there we thought was a debacle, a lot of us people thought "well, i liked that because he's not playing th game, he's not playing gotcha, he's not saying nasty things." that that helped the balance for him. >> rose: i'll tell you who didn't like it, his campaign staff. >> i asked, -- at the end of the interview i said to him i ran into somebody during the course of the campaign who useded to work for you who is now the mayor of a major american city. >> rose: could it be chicago? (laughs) >> and i said to him "what happened, rahm, in that first debate?" and rahm looked at me and said "he haa hawaii moment." and when i said that the president laughed very loudly and he caught himself back and he told this lovely story there meant meant that when things seemed to be going to hell in a hand basket he and rahm would sit in the oval office and think "what w
what is going on in washington now between the president and the speaker, but if we -- if they fail completely and we go over this fiscal cliff what are the repercussions? you know, i mean, there is really a fair chance that they don't come to an agreement for whatever reason the house republicans won't support it and we go into 2013. i don't think that, per say, would be the end of the world because i think there would be a cry and it would get rein reined in after a few weeks and settle on this .. i would view this as a skirmish in a bigger war where you are growing entitlements, government services are getting more expensive. people are going to pay more and get less, and i think it is a very, very difficult tension of how to deal with that and this is just a first stage of that or one of many stages. so i don't think they are going to settle everything. i do hope they come to an agreement. i certainly hope we don't see another debt ceiling fiasco having the u.s. default on its debt, even technically would be pretty ugly. >> rose: what would be a reasonable agreement in your eyes
that dickens invented christmas completely. untrue. washington irving invested christmas in the sense in which we mean it. dickens wanted to make christmas into a symbol of something. obviously what he was saying if we can be kind to each other on this one day of the year why can't we extend it across the whole of the year? as he says and look on those below us as fellow passengers to the grave. but actually christmas caroly mernled not out of any consideration of christmas but out of the parliamentary report on the employment of children in the mines. dickens read it with such disgust and horror he determined, as he said to strike a hedge hammer blow against such activities. the book is the direct result of that. the poor of the book comes when the spirit of christmas present is about to take his leave of scrooge. scrooge did i southeasterns two feral children emerging from the roabz of the spirit. he says spirit are these children yours? and the spirit says they are mankind's. the girl is want. the boy is ignorance. he says those two will destroy civilization. that is the absolute core of th
kerry washington, too. she plays-- >> she plays django's wife, broomhilda. >> rose: and there are some terrible lashing scenes in the movie. >> there's a flashback where django remembers him-- the reason they got-- the reason they're in the predicament at the beginning of the movie is they tried to escape together and they got captured. so they whipped-- whip kerry, and whip broomhilda, and burn runaway "r's" into kerry's cheek and django's cheek and sell them separately. once django gets free and becomes a bounty hunter now he needs to track her down and save her. in the movie he has a flashback where he remembers her whipping. and it's a-- you know, it's a very disturbing scene. you actually never see the whip actually touch her back, but it's just in kerry's face. un-- whenever you see-- i've never qiept bought it when i see movies where people get whipped because i just know that pain is so unimaginable that people would be losing it a lot more than they ever do in movies. it's almost like brando-esque, and i never bought that. kerry dug deep in herself to actually give a true huma
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 56 (some duplicates have been removed)

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